Special Extended Enrollment Period for South Georgia!

FAQ

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If you have further questions don’t hesitate in calling us at out TOLL FREE number. You can connect with one of our certified Navigators or in case we miss your call, you can leave a Voicemail or call back number. Find out if you are eligible to enroll through a Special Enrollment Period by contacting us TODAY

Our CERTIFIED Navigators are providing enrollment assistance Monday-Sunday from 9AM to 7PM.

Top Questions

  • November 1, 2018: Open Enrollment begins.

    December 15, 2018: Open Enrollment ends. After December 15, you can still buy a health plan if you qualify for a Special Enrollment Period.

    January 1, 2019: Plans sold during Open Enrollment start.

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2019 plans and prices will be available for preview shortly before Open Enrollment starts on November 1, 2018.

For now, read these Marketplace tips and use this checklist (PDF) to gather everything you’ll need to apply.

- Get a quick overview of the Marketplace, and see if you're eligible to apply.

- Make sure you have everything you need by using this checklist (PDF).

- Preview 2019 plans and prices before you apply.

Your savings depend on your expected household income for 2019. To get a quick idea if you’ll save, select your household size and state. We'll tell you if your income's in the saving range. You'll find out exactly how much you'll save when you apply.

Outside Open Enrollment, you can get health insurance only 2 ways:


-With a Special Enrollment Period. You can qualify if you lose job-based coverage, have a baby, get married, or have certain other life changes. Answer a few quick questions to see if you may qualify.


-Through Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). You can apply any time and can enroll immediately if you're eligible.


If you don’t qualify for either, you can apply for 2019 Marketplace coverage as soon as November 1, 2018.

You can upload the documents online, which is the fastest and easiest way to get them processed. Or you can mail copies instead.

Apply & Enroll

The Open Enrollment Period for 2019 health insurance is Thursday, November 1, 2018, through Saturday, December 15, 2018.

Until it starts, you can enroll in health insurance for the rest of 2018 only if you qualify for a Special Enrollment Period. See if you qualify.

You can also apply for Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) any time of year.

If you don't update your application or change plans between November 1 and December 15, you'll probably be automatically re-enrolled in the same plan (or a similar one) for 2019.

Even if you're happy with your plan and don't have any life changes to report (like a move or income changes), you should still take a look at the plans available to you. You might benefit from a change, and you won’t know until you compare.

Get help deciding whether to keep or change your plan (PDF).

You can apply online, by phone, with the help of a trained assister in your community, through an agent or broker, or with a paper application. Learn more.

When you apply, you'll provide details about your household, your income, and any coverage you currently have.


Use our checklist (PDF) to make sure you're ready.

Outside Open Enrollment, you can get health insurance only 2 ways:

-With a Special Enrollment Period. You can qualify if you lose job-based coverage, have a baby, get married, or have certain other life changes. Answer a few quick questions to see if you may qualify.

-Through Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). You can apply any time and can enroll immediately if you're eligible.

If you don’t qualify for either, you can apply for 2019 Marketplace coverage as soon as November 1, 2018, and coverage will start January 1, 2019.

Renew or Change Coverage

You'll get two notices by November 1 — one from the Marketplace, one from your insurance company. Together they explain:

-If your plan is available for 2019, and if it's changing
- How much it will cost in 2019
- How to compare, change, or keep plans

If you don't act by December 15, you'll probably be automatically re-enrolled in your 2018 plan (or a similar one) for 2019.

Automatic enrollment is a good fallback. But the best way to make sure you have a 2019 plan that works for you, with accurate savings, is to log in as soon as November 1, update your information, and view all your options.

If you don’t get your insurance company letter by November 1, contact your insurance company. If you don’t get the Marketplace letter by then, contact the Call Center.

If you don't update your application or change plans by December 15, you'll probably be automatically enrolled in your current plan (or a similar one) for 2019. You can update as soon as November 1.

Automatic enrollment isn't always the best choice. There may be new and more affordable plans available this year. If you don't update your application with any income and household changes you expect for 2019, you could lose your eligibility for savings, or you could wind up owing money when you file 2019 taxes.

Starting November 1, log in to your Marketplace account. You'll see a 2019 application, pre-filled with some of your 2018 information. Update the information, then choose a new plan or renew.

Note: When you enroll or re-enroll in a plan for 2019, you don’t need to take action to cancel your 2018 plan.

If you need to cancel your 2018 plan so it ends before January 1, 2019, you do need to take action.


When and how to end your Marketplace plan depends on your situation and who you're cancelling for. For step-by-step instructions, answer a few questions about why you’re ending coverage.


IMPORTANT: Don't end your plan until you know for sure when your new coverage begins.

Costs and Savings

The only way to know for sure is to fill out an application starting November 1. But to get a quick idea, select your household size and estimated income.

You can also provide some simple information and get a quick estimate of what plans may cost you for 2019.

"Cost-sharing reductions" lower your out-of-pocket costs for health insurance. If you qualify, you must enroll in a Silver plan to get these extra savings. With Silver, you’ll have a pretty low premium, with a lower deductible and lower costs whenever you go to the doctor or have other medical expenses.

Find out why a Silver plan might be your best choice.

The Marketplace bases savings on your estimated income for the year you want coverage — not last year's.

- Learn how to make an estimate of your expected income.
- See what counts as income.

Most households include:


The person applying for coverage

Their spouse if married

Anybody they claim as a tax dependent — including those who don't need health coverage. When you apply, you can say who needs coverage and who doesn’t.

Learn more about who to include in your household.

When choosing a plan, it’s a good idea to think about your total health care costs, not just the bill (the “premium”) you pay to your insurance company every month.

Other amounts, sometimes called “out-of-pocket” costs, have a big impact on your total spending on health care – sometimes more than the premium itself.

Beyond your monthly premium: Deductible and out-of-pocket costs

  • Deductible: How much you have to spend for covered health services before your insurance company pays anything (except free preventive services)
  • Copayments and coinsurance: Payments you make each time you get a medical service after reaching your deductible
  • Out-of-pocket maximum: The most you have to spend for covered services in a year. After you reach this amount, the insurance company pays 100% for covered services.

How to estimate your yearly total costs of care

In order to pick a plan based on your total costs of care, you’ll need to estimate the medical services you’ll use for the year ahead. Of course it’s impossible to predict the exact amount. So think about how much care you usually use, or are likely to use.

  • Before you compare plans when you’re logged in to HealthCare.gov or preview plans and prices before you log in, you can choose each family member’s expected medical use as low, medium, or high.
  • When you view plans, you’ll see an estimate of your total costs — including monthly premiums and all out-of-pocket costs — based on your household’s expected use of care.
  • Your actual expenses will vary, but the estimate is useful for comparing plans’ total impact on your household budget.

Total costs & “metal” categories

When you compare plans in the Marketplace, the plans appear in 4 “metal” categories: Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum. The categories are based on how you and the health plan share the total costs of your care.

Generally speaking, categories with higher premiums (Gold, Platinum) pay more of your total costs of health care. Categories with lower premiums (Bronze, Silver) pay less of your total costs. (But see the exception about Silver plans below.)

So how do you find a category that works for you?

  • If you don’t expect to use regular medical services and don’t take regular prescriptions: You may want a Bronze plan. These plans can have very low monthly premiums, but have high deductibles and pay less of your costs when you need care.
  • If you qualify for "cost-sharing reductions": Silver plans may offer good value. If you qualify for extra savings ("cost-sharing reductions") your deductible will be lower and you’ll pay less each time you get care. But you get these cost-sharing reductions ONLY if you enroll in Silver plan. If you don’t qualify for extra savings, compare premiums and out-of-pocket costs of Silver and Gold prices to find the right plan for you.
  • If you expect a lot of doctor visits or need regular prescriptions: You may want a Gold plan or Platinum plan. These plans generally have higher monthly premiums but pay more of your costs when you need care.

Tips about the MarketPlace

  • Plans sold during Open Enrollment start January 1, 2019.
  • After December 15, you can enroll in 2019 health insurance only if you qualify for a Special Enrollment Period.

If you don't have health insurance through a job, Medicare, Medicaid, the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), or another source that provides qualifying health coverage, the Marketplace can help you get covered.

  • If you have job-based insurance: You can buy a plan through the Marketplace, but you'll pay full price unless your employer's insurance doesn't meet certain standards. Most job-based plans do meet the standards.
  • If you have Medicare: You can't switch to Marketplace insurance, supplement your coverage with a Marketplace plan, or buy a Marketplace dental plan. Learn about Medicare and the Marketplace.

Your savings depend on your expected household income for the year. Over 8 in 10 people who apply are eligible to save.

Get a quick idea if you'll save. Based on your income estimate, we'll tell you if you qualify for:

A health insurance plan with savings based on your income

  • You may qualify for a premium tax credit that lowers your monthly insurance bill, and for extra savings on out-of-pocket costs like deductibles and copayments.
  • The plans are offered by private insurance companies with a range of prices and features.

Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)

Medicaid and CHIP provide free or low-cost coverage to millions of people and families with limited income, disabilities, and some other situations.

Starting November 1, you can apply any way that works for you:

  • Online
  • By phone
  • With in-person help
  • Through an agent or broker
  • With a paper application

To be eligible to enroll in health coverage through the Marketplace, you:

If you have Medicare coverage, you’re not eligible to use the Marketplace to buy a health or dental plan.


U.S. citizens living outside the U.S.

U.S. citizens living in a foreign country for at least 330 days of a 12-month period are not required to get health insurance coverage for that 12-month period. If you're uninsured and living abroad under this definition, you qualify for a health insurance exemption for plan years 2018 and earlier. This means you don’t have to pay the fee that other uninsured people must pay when they file their taxes.

Note: Starting with the 2019 plan year (for which you’ll file taxes in April 2020), the fee no longer applies. If you don’t have coverage during 2019 or later, you don’t need an exemption in order to avoid the penalty.

See question 12 on this IRS web page to learn more about the rules for people living abroad.

Generally, health insurance in the Marketplace covers health care provided by doctors, hospitals, and other providers within the United States. If you're living abroad, it's important to know this before you consider buying Marketplace insurance.

If you’re considered a “resident” of the United States for tax purposes, you’re eligible to use the Marketplace.

A U.S. national is someone who’s a U.S. citizen or a person who isn’t a U.S. citizen but owes permanent allegiance to the U.S.

With extremely limited exception by which he or she is entitled to be protected, all non-citizen U.S. nationals are people born in American Samoa or abroad with one or more American Samoan parents under certain conditions.

U.S. territories can decide whether to create their own Health Insurance Marketplace or expand Medicaid coverage. Residents of a U.S. territory aren't eligible to apply for health coverage using the federal or state Marketplace unless they also qualify as a resident within the service area of a Marketplace.

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